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Do Ho Suh
Drawings

September 11 – October 25, 2014
201 Chrystie Street & 540 West 26th Street, New York

Robin Rhode
having been there

September 17 – November 8, 2014
Hong Kong

Lehmann Maupin New York:
540 West 26th Street, New York 10001 +1 212 255 2923
201 Chrystie Street, New York 10002 +1 212 254 0054

Lehmann Maupin Hong Kong:
407 Pedder Building, 12 Pedder Street Hong Kong +852 2530 0025

No Longer Empty presents… Nari Ward's Sugar Hill Smiles!

Part of the “If You Build It” exhibition in Sugar Hill, Sugar Hill Smiles mimics the form of mass-manufactured preservative cans, this art work references Piero Manzoni’s “Artist Shit” project, which called into question the notion of faith in the artist’s vision that bestowed value on anything an artist produces.

Ward’s project is more than an art insider’s joke. The smile in question here refers to the “canned” cliché of the happy African American minstrel character whose expression is meant to reassure the dominant class/audience that all is well with the status quo, be at ease. The minstrel’s “smile” can also be said to continue in the service industry where too often chattel slavery has been replaced by wage slavery, long brutal working hours and conditions for little pay—a fact hidden in the mechanisms of consumer cultures which function on smooth running and apparent pleasure in service.

Sugar Hill Smiles, however, engages with the action of ‘canning the smile’ from a different vantage point. With a former US president declaring his allegiance to Harlem and a slew of trendy restaurants opening to new occupants, real estate brokers are careful about the fragile nature of its investments and are quick to brand proximity without declaring their allegiances. Sugar Hill Smiles addresses how the Harlem brand is being marketed for the profit of so many that have very little direct investment in the neighborhood. Ward’s project adopts the Sugar Hill brand as Harlem’s own smile manufacturing center. The community members were invited to smile into 2,000-mirrored interior cans, which will be labeled and sealed.

Purchase Sugar Hill Smiles by artist Nari Ward, each smile is sold for $10 USD. Proceeds to benefit Broadway Housing Communities educational programming.

I have no block because I never force anything – or rather I don’t demand success. Sometimes I like my pictures, other times I don’t: it doesn’t get to me like it might other artists. I only really identify with painting the painting. I’m not invested in identifying myself as painter or writer or musician, these are just things that I do, I refuse to be defined by them. This might lead people to think that I don’t care about what I do, but I do. I care and love it deeply.
Billy Childish on Creativity,” in anothermaghttp://goo.gl/GLixwA
Billy Childish talks creativity, hope and radical traditionalism in anothermag:

"My approach to creating music and art is unusual as I don’t fear or care much about an audience or possible failure. Basically, if the painting goes well I get out of the way and allow the picture to paint itself. Sometimes I have to step in and that’s when the trouble begins. The sooner I step out of it again and stop trying to impose my will, the better.”

Read the feature here.

Billy Childish talks creativity, hope and radical traditionalism in anothermag:

"My approach to creating music and art is unusual as I don’t fear or care much about an audience or possible failure. Basically, if the painting goes well I get out of the way and allow the picture to paint itself. Sometimes I have to step in and that’s when the trouble begins. The sooner I step out of it again and stop trying to impose my will, the better.”

Read the feature here.

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Teresita Fernández’s As Above So Below

For more photos and videos from As Above So Below, follow @massmoca on Instagram.

Teresita Fernández (@teresitafz) created As Above So Below in response to the old factory space that houses the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (@massmoca) as well as the light that surrounds it. “The color in the works is meant to radiate a glowing light that changes with the tone of daylight pouring in through the windows of the space,” the artist says. “In many ways, the shapes and color of the works are like cinematic dissolves that seem ephemeral.”

The vivid colors and monumental scale of the works make them popular to photograph. “All of the works in the show deal with the idea of the viewer as a figure in the landscape,” Teresita says. “Visitors have captured that sensibility and played with that idea in their own photographs.”

As Above So Below is on view until March 2015.

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Throwback Thursday

In 1998, Teresita Fernández was an International Artist in Residence at Artpace San Antonio. While in residence she presented her project, “Borrowed Landscape.”

Listen to Fernández discuss her latest solo-exhibition As Above So Below, currently on view at massmoca through April 2015 on The modernartnotes podcast: http://goo.gl/Nmpzbn

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